Sales Presentations: Getting To The Point Fast And Effectively

Don't Lose Them In Rambling Sales Presentations

Studies indicate that people today concentrate less time in one particular topic than ever before. It is thus more obvious than ever that sales presentations must be short and to the point.

The most important part of the presentation should be compressed into just a few minutes, leaving the remaining time to question and answer interaction with the members of the organization.

In general, presentations should last 25 to 30 minutes with the most important parts of the presentation to be discuss in less than 10. This not only to assure that your audience will remain alert and interested but will assure that they (and you) have enough time to ask any questions and make comments that could help you better develop a plan for their company’s needs.

If your presentation cannot possibly be done in just under 20 minutes, divide your presentation into separate but distinguishable parts. Perhaps a 10-minute first part with a short break period where you can have a Q & A section would be best.

Once the Q & A section is over, move on to the second part of your sales presentation. Do a quick one-minute recap of what was discussed. This will help you regain control of the room and will help the audience regain concentration.

Try keeping your first Q & A section relatively short. You may have to schedule a second one, and this could make your overall presentation too long.




This online education module sponsored by the Sales Career Training Institute covers the basics of a wide variety of sales strategies, tactics and techniques.

To find out now about more advanced sales strategies for sales presentations, check out the newly revised version of the book, FEAR Selling: How You Can Sell More and Sell Faster By Tapping Into Your Prospects’ Deep-Seated Emotional Needs.




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